Close

When the World Feels Upside Down… Together We Can (plus: bonus photo of me in middle school)

I want to send a HUGE thank you to all of the people who signed up for, donated to and shared my Headshots for Women’s Rights Fundraiser.

With your help, I was able to donate $1,000 (plus transaction fees) to The Lilith Fund, and $1,000 (plus transaction fees) to Women for Afghan Women.

And I was able to spend time with and photograph these beautiful people.

I also want to send a big THANK YOU to Keller Street CoWork, who generously donated the space for the photo shoots, and to Elizabeth Mori, who volunteered to assist during the photo shoots.

It feels really good to live in a community that cares so much about others and strives to make the world better, especially when the world feels upside down.

And when the world feels upside down, I feel very lucky to be able to use my photography to help in the way I know how. When I get discouraged that what I can do doesn’t feel like much, I remember my middle school motto: Together We Can.

Middle school photo for reference, see if you can guess which one is me. PS: I am grateful every day social media did not exist when I was in middle school.

Thank you for supporting my photography and women’s rights. While this fundraiser has finished, I guarantee there will be more fundraisers in the future. So let me know your photo needs and stay tuned for future photo fundraisers. Happy Giving Tuesday!

Headshots for Women’s Rights

As you have probably heard, women’s rights are under attack in Afghanistan and in Texas.

Listening to the news makes me feel helpless. Helpless because I don’t have money to donate, and helpless because I live in a small crowded house and don’t have any room for refugees, although I have thought about trying to make it work.

Photo of a young woman leaning forward with her hand on her chin in front of a grey backdrop.


And then I remembered I can offer photo shoots, like I have done in the past. I have been thinking about doing a headshot day for awhile, so now feels like the time to do it.


I have chosen two organizations who are helping women in these immediate crisis areas: Women for Afghan Women and the Lilith Fund in Texas.

Women for Afghan Women (WAW) is the largest women’s organization in Afghanistan, with over 850 local Afghan staff working tirelessly to provide support services to women, children, and families.
The Lilith Fund is the oldest abortion fund in Texas, serving the central and southern regions of our state with direct financial assistance for abortions. We provide financial assistance and emotional support while building community spaces for people who need abortions in Texas—unapologetically, with compassion and conviction. Through organizing and movement-building, we foster a positive culture around abortion, strengthen people power, and fight for reproductive justice in and with our communities. 


What is the headshot deal…

The cost of a 20min headshot session will be $350 and I will donate $175 to the nonprofit you choose, either Women for Afghan Women or the Lilith Fund in Texas. You will get 2 edited high resolution files of your choice and all unedited digital files.


How does it work…

  1. Sign up for a twenty minute photo shoot on either September 26th or October 3rd here: https://paigegreenphotography.setmore.com
  2. Send me a venmo, with the name of the nonprofit you choose, for either $350 – OR
  3. Send me a venmo for $175 and an email (paigegreenphoto@gmail.com) with a receipt of your donation to one of the two organizations for a minimum of $175
  4. If you want to be extra generous and pay it forward to a local a BIPOC and/or LGBTQ+ person in need of headshots then please send me a venmo, with the name of the nonprofit you choose, for $700 and that will cover the cost of a headshot and donation for you and an extra person.


Woman in grey top looking at the camera while leaning against the wall with hands held in front of her waist.

More details…

Who: All people are welcome to sign up for a headshot. If you don’t need a headshot but want to squeeze in a quick family shoot that’s ok too. I love animals, you can definitely bring your pets.

What: The headshots can be used for whatever you need them for.

Where: I am not sure the exact location in Petaluma the headshots will be held yet. You will get an email with details after you register. If you have a location that you think would be ideal, please let me know. I’d love to hear some ideas.

How:

  • If you have to cancel, please do so with as much notice as possible.
  • If you realize you can’t make your slot at the last minute, please try to find a friend to fill your spot.
  • There will be no refunds if you cancel the day of the photo shoot.
  • The schedule will be tight, so please arrive a little early, so you don’t miss your spot.
  • If it is an unhealthy smokey air day then I will reschedule.
  • At this point I only have two days available for this special offer. If it goes well then maybe I’ll offer more.
  • I will wear a mask and stay six feet away and hopefully the location will be outside, or at least have a big open door to keep the fresh air moving.
  • I need a helper each day, so if you would like headshots, but can not afford the cost, but have time to volunteer then please send me an email: paigegreenphoto@gmail.com
  • If you need a tax deduction then please make the donation directly to one of the two nonprofits.
  • If you don’t need photos, but want to pay it forward that is awesome too. I am happy to offer your photo shoot to a local Petaluman who needs photos.
  • I wish I could donate the entire fee to the nonprofits as I have done in the past, but I need to feed my family as well, so this year I am donating half the amount. Usually my headshots cost over $600, so this is a deal.
  • All photos on this page are samples of headshots I have taken over the years. I do not know what the background will be yet, but I will try to let you know ahead of time.

THANK YOU for reading this far. Please share this post with anyone in the SF Bay Area, who you think would like the opportunity to support women’s human rights and get some new headshots. If you live in a different part of the Bay Area and think you know enough people who would be interested, I am happy to come to different towns too. Thank you for caring and sharing. I hope to see your faces soon. xxx

Celebrating Family in Petaluma…

To see the Celebrating Family exhibit grab a map and scavenger hunt form at Copperfields or the Petaluma Arts Center and head downtown Petaluma. Share your thoughts about the exhibit and your favorite photos on social media with #celebratingfamilypetaluma

During the summer of 2020, at the peak of the racial reckoning across the United States, I photographed a protest in my town after the murder of George Floyd and other unarmed Black people by police. At that protest I met Maude and her five-year-old boy, who was the same age as my son. I couldn’t escape the significance that her Black son was leading protesters in chants as we marched down the street, while my white son watched quietly by my side.

Shortly after that protest Maude’s family found someone had written the N-word on their car in front of their Petaluma home.

Heartbroken by that news, I reached out to Maude and asked her if I could photograph her family, as a gift to honor their love and humanity. She accepted my offer and we scheduled our photo shoot. When I arrived, her son raced to greet me and gave me the first non-family hug I had received in three months since Covid lockdown. That hug dissolved my heart.

After that photo shoot I reached out to a couple of other Black and biracial families in my community and offered family portraits. I was unsure of what, if anything, I would do with the photos, but I felt compelled to do something and this is what I could do.

Three months later, as I was speaking with Faith Ross, the president of Petaluma Blacks for Community Development, I learned that the national theme for Black History month in 2021 was going to be Celebrating Family. I told Faith I had started this portrait project and would love to contribute portraits for her annual Black History exhibit. She was excited about the idea but told me she wanted to include all families, not just Black families, because PBCD has always been open to all families since they started in 1978. And because the Petaluma History Museum, the home of the annual Black History month exhibit, was likely going to be closed due to Covid, we needed to find another way to display the photos. Faith suggested we use the vacant buildings downtown, while I wondered why not all the businesses downtown. With our plan in place, now we just needed more families.

Knowing I wanted to reach as many families as possible, but unsure how to photograph multiple families efficiently and safely, especially during a pandemic, I reached out to Kinyatta, an inspiring community leader and activist, for advice. She gave me the good idea of picking a date and location and allowing families to sign up for photo shoot slots, while also asking them for quotes about what family means to them. That plan worked perfectly until the stay-at-home order was put in place. But with permission from the health department and with very careful Covid restrictions established, the photo shoots continued.

After days and days of scheduling, emailing, and texting families, I held six all-day photo shoots, with the help of generous volunteers, who graciously gave up their weekends to stand in the cold parking lot with me at the wonderful Maria Do Ceu’s Outwest Garage.

And after several editing all-nighters, and multiple calls and trips to Bill, the patient printer at The Digital Grange, and after very careful planning of which portraits should go where and at what size, with the museum problem solving master Heather Fordham, only to have to ditch that plan and start over many more times during the week of hanging enormous paper prints in the rain with Molly Best, my superhero business outreach manager, and her talented installation expert husband, Danial Moorehouse, and the friends, who answered my last minute desperate call for more installers, the Celebrating Family exhibit is finally up in over 46 businesses in downtown Petaluma for the month of February.

To see the Celebrating Family exhibit grab a map and scavenger hunt form at Copperfields or the Petaluma Vistor Center and head downtown Petaluma. Share your thoughts about the exhibit and your favorite photos on social media with #celebratingfamilypetaluma

Thank you to…

• Faith Ross and Gloria Robinson for all you have done in this community for 43 years. You are an inspiration.

• The uber talented Christine Walker at The Design Guild, who jumped in and took on the whole design process, creating a beautiful logo, map, scavenger hunt, posters and website with enthusiasm.

Keller Street Co-Work for being the perfect lifesaving basecamp for our print distribution.

• The City of Petaluma for believing in and sponsoring this project.

• All the businesses who generously allowed us to fill their valuable window space for this exhibit.

• All the community members who donated, showed up, offered their time, talents and words of encouragement.

• My family, my reason for being.

And finally, a HUGE thank you to all the families who trusted me, during a pandemic, to take their portrait and share their family stories.

My motivation for this project was to build relationships and strengthen community. And my hope is that together we heal, together we close the divide, together we celebrate differences and together we make Petaluma a safe, welcoming place for ALL families to live and thrive.

If you like this project and would like to support this and future projects to strengthen Petaluma, please join Petaluma Blacks for Community Development and TIDE, Team for Inclusivity, Diversity and Equity.

Welcoming the Lucky Ox and a Gift for YOU…

Italia A Collection for Fibershed, model Dorine Euteneier and styling by Tessa Watson.

Dear Friends and Family, 

What a year 2020 has been. For those who have lost loved ones during this year, I am deeply sorry for your loss and pain. 

For those who have gotten sick, lost jobs, suffered from depression and isolation, experienced the emotional drain and trauma from the racial upheaval, were affected by wild fires, struggled with distance learning and juggling it all, I am also so, so sorry… it has been a lot. 

My family certainly had our struggles, but thankfully we have been healthy and we have had the support of many, so I feel incredibly lucky and grateful. 

‘Almost Nine’ was selected by Franklin Tipton for a Personal Choice award in the 2020 SF Something Personal Exhibition.

This year could not have worked without the support of our essential worker, my mom. She was our distance learning teacher for both boys and she gave Arann and I the gift of time together. 

This year also could not have worked without the financial support of my brother, who sent us stimulus checks when we didn’t get any from the government. Arann essentially lost all income since Farm Camp and Animal Music were shut down and he was never able to receive unemployment. 

I was lucky to continue to work (turns out photography works pretty well with covid: 6 feet away, outside and with a mask), and I will be forever grateful to Stemple Creek Ranch, Acre Pizza, FEED Sonoma, Fibershed, Made Local and Marietta Winery for keeping me working when all other work stopped. 

Stemple Creek Ranch
Acre Pizza

Monan’s Rill for Made Local photographed in June before it burned in the Glass Fire in August.

Film portrait of Nasimiyu Wekeasa for Fibershed.
Marietta Cellars

I am also grateful to all of the families, wedding couples, and small businesses who supported my work.

Film portrait of Angie and Pete, July 11th, 2020.
The Life Brief by Bonnie Wan.

Please know that when you support my photography, not only are you supporting my family, who shops locally and sustainably whenever possible, but you are also supporting ALL of the work I do, including pro-bono documentary projects…

“Celebrating Family” for Petaluma Blacks for Community Development.

And the discounted work I do for nonprofits such as COTS, Fibershed, Homeward Bound and Side-by-Side.

FILM PORTRAIT OF RED BIRD IN A DOGBANE PATCH FOR FIBERSHED.
HOMEWARD BOUND OF MARIN

As a thank you to all of those who have supported me over the years, I am offering you FREE downloads of all of your photos. Send me an email and I’ll send you a link to download your photos as they are in the galleries. If you want any photos edited, there will be additional costs for the editing time.

And for all past clients, if you book a photo shoot with me in 2021 I will give you a $100 discount. For all new clients, I will give you a $50 discount. Just reference this post when you get in touch to book your photo shoot.

And finally, I know there are some folks who have made donations to fundraisers I’ve done in the past but who have not booked a photo shoot with me yet. If I owe you a photo shoot, please let me know so we can get your photo shoot booked in the new year. 

Phew. I think that’s it. Thank you all so much. I am glad to have weathered this year with your love and support and I look forward to welcoming the year of the Ox…

According to the Chinese zodiac, 2021 is the year of the Ox. This year is going to be lucky and also perfect to focus on relationships, whether we are talking about friendships or love.

This year, no explosive or catastrophic events will occur, so it is a favorable year for economic recovery or consolidation, a year of long-term investments (especially for creating a reserve stock for the coming unproductive years).

The Metal Ox year is also great for making order in the family life. After all, if the family life is peaceful, everything gets solved!

Chinese Horoscope 2021 – Year of the Metal Ox

Happy Year of the Ox!

Love,

Paige

The Arlo Chapter (2009-2020)

Today is our first Arloversary without Arlo.

His chapter in our life was as significant as they come. Obama was just elected president and Arann and I were just married. A year later Arann was hit by a drunk driver. The year after that our first baby was born at home, with Arlo’s help. And two years after that another baby was added to the family.

He was the perfect family dog. Not once did he growl or complain about his role in life as the trampoline, the step stool, the pillow, the bucking bronco, the hot wheel launch pad, or the stick wrestling opponent. He was never happier than when he was in the middle. He would put on the brakes if someone other than a family member tried to walk him, yet he would jump the fence and walk himself to visit houses he knew might have food left out (twice he got himself stuck in houses after cleaning out their cat bowls.)

It was impossible to imagine our family without Arlo in the middle. And then, on September 14th, 2020, one week before our 11th Arloversary, in the middle of a global pandemic, with CA skies full of wildfire smoke, a national reckoning with racism and our democracy in limbo, my mask wearing children and I learned in the emergency vet’s office that Arlo’s swollen belly was the cause of an aggressive cancer and even surgery couldn’t save him. Within hours, and with the help of friends, I found an incredible vet who came to our house to let us say goodbye to him in our home while eating dog treats. Arlo is now buried in our yard, where he can still be in the middle of everything.

To say we have a hole in our hearts is an understatement, but we are grateful to have shared a life with Arlo for 11 of our most important years. We do still have sweet little Billy, but even he seems sad and lost, like Robin without Batman.

So I imagine there will be another dog chapter starting soon, because there are heartbreakingly so many dogs who need homes, but there will never be another Arlo.

“A Dog, on His Master” by Billy Collins.

~GRAMMATOLATRY

As young as I look,
I am growing older faster than he,
seven to one
is the ratio they tend to say.

Whatever the number,
I will pass him one day
and take the lead
the way I do on our walks in the woods.

And if this ever manages
to cross his mind,
it would be the sweetest
shadow I have ever cast on snow or grass.

The Dream is Over…

Philando Castile was my George Floyd.

In 2016 Philando Castile was pulled over for a traffic stop and then shot five times and killed in front of his girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, and her four year old child, after Castile told officer, Jeronimo Yanez, that he was carrying a licensed gun.

My son was four years old when Philando Castile was murdered, the same age as the little girl in the car. Realizing that I could protect my white son from even knowing about police violence, let alone ever experiencing it, was my wake up call.

I didn’t have to have “the talk” that all Black and Brown parents have to have with their children to try and keep them safe from police officers. Police officers were the “good guys” who my boys wanted to be when they grew up.

The fact that I was able to live for 36 years in the “Dream” is my white privilege.

“In his book “Between the World and Me,” Ta-Nehisi Coates describes whiteness as a Dream. The Dreamers, defined by Coates as people who believe themselves to be white, live in varying states of power over black people and other people of color. Usually oblivious to having that power, we don’t think too hard about how we got it. The Dream relies on forgetting and denial. The Dream says, “I have nothing to do with slavery. My ancestors weren’t on this continent at that time. Everyone has equal access to opportunities. Racism is over,” writes Mark Gunnary for the Baltimore Sun.

My boys and I have done a lot of reading, watching, and talking about racism since I woke up from the Dream. Now my 6 and 8 year olds know about systematic racism, police violence and they can explain why we say, “Black Lives Matter,” instead of, “All Lives Matter”.

My boys understand that no one wants to spend their Saturdays protesting against police violence, but if we don’t protest, things won’t change.

It has been four years since Philando Castile’s death. For those curious what happened with Castile’s case:

• The police officer was found not guilty.

Diamond Reynolds was awarded $800,000 but then was publicly insulted by Former Rice County sheriff’s deputy Tom McBroom, who tweeted in 2017 that Reynolds’ settlement would be “gone in 6 months on crack cocaine.”

• Tom McBroom (the insulter) became the town’s mayor.

And the police shootings are worse in 2020 than they have been in previous years. As of September 2020, Police have killed 781 people and Black people have been 28% of those killed despite being only 13% of the population.

In the words of Philando Castile’s best friend, Greg Crockett, after George Floyd’s death: “They won’t stop killing us. We want you to stop killing us.”

How do we stop racism and dismantle white supremacy?

In his book, How to be Anti-racist, Ibram X. Kendi argues that it’s not enough to say you’re not a racist. “Saying you are not racist signifies neutrality: ‘I am not a racist, but neither am I aggressively against racism.’ One either allows racial inequities to persevere, as a racist, or confronts racial inequities, as an antiracist.”

Below are some of my favorite antiracist actions and resources….

1) Vote Vote Vote – national, state and local politics matter (53 days until the election)

2) Read:
Books Nonfiction
How to Be Antiracist in adult/teen and kid versions by Ibram X. Kendi
My Grandmother’s Hands by Resmaa Menakem
Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson (you can watch the movie or the documentary)

Books Fiction
Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi
The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas (also a movie)

3) Listen: Podcast: https://www.sceneonradio.org/seeing-white/

4) Follow and Donate:
Colors of Change
NAACP
Equal Justice Initiative
Teaching Tolerance
The Conscious Kid

5) Act Locally: find out how you can get involved in your schools and community. If you live in Petaluma, we’d love for you to join TIDE.

What are some of your favorite antiracist resources?

My Stimulus Pledge to You…

 

boys

Dear Friends and Family,

Who would have imagined that in 2020, our lives to go from this…
nypaigegreen-NY_MG_3421
To this…
325780_0011
So I wanted to check in with you, because we have been through a lot of life together.
513_KakiJulia_09142019_paigegreen_270224_0007
Over the past 15 years I have photographed close to 200 weddings, and at least twice as many families, one birth, and one almost birth (thanks to rush-hour traffic crossing the Bay Bridge on a Friday). I’ve documented birthday parties, anniversary parties, before and after cancer journeys, and most recently I photographed a couple who just learned one of them is facing a terminal cancer diagnosis.
pumpkin-101508-058

I’ve photographed a documentary film, 20 books, dozens of small businesses, artists, non-profits, and some of those for over 10 years.

paigegreenFibershedPastures12142015-214

It has been an incredible honor to be invited into so many lives, and a gift to be able to support my family through photography.
paigegreenBigFlip-Portland111914-0197
To those who are struggling during this time, because of health and or financial reasons, I am sending my deepest love. This is the hard. Really hard.
paigegreenSarahEntrup06232016-221
My family has been lucky (so far) to have our health, but because both my husband and I are self-employed, we are likely not receiving much help from the government, so we are definitely nervous about the future. We are trying to figure out what jobs are fire proof, recession proof, drought proof and pandemic proof. (Let us know if you have any suggestions that would work for a photographer and a musician/farm educator.)
325783_0011
But we are the lucky ones. We have an incredibly supportive and encouraging family and community… we know we will be ok. This is a challenge for us to get creative, downsize and try new things.
amish7-10-07-3
We know that so many other people have a much harder reality and are struggling with much bigger challenges. If you are struggling, please know I am here for you, for your family, for your business, if you ever need me. Together we will make it through this.
paigegreenBetany04122016-119
If you need photography for any reason, once the shelter-in-place order has been lifted, please let me know. No one will be turned away for lack of funds. I want to help artists, small businesses and non-profits, who have struggled the most, get back on their feet.

paigegreenFibershed41914-617

This time has made it very clear that our teachers, doctors, nurses, grocery workers, farmers, garbage collectors, postal workers, and first responders keep our bodies alive.

Messages Image(3890274896)

But our artists, musicians, authors, dancers, comedians and nature keep our souls alive. Our bodies can not live without our souls, and our souls can not live without our bodies.
000082310013-FarmFlowerAyan-032017
I am excited about the stories of wildlife making a come back, air pollution clearing up, animal shelters being out of animals, and local farmers finally getting the recognition that they need. It gives me hope that because of this pause, we will see what is broken and take the time to fix it.
061_Sunrise_MadeLocal_02082020_paigegreen
This article really inspired me and I encourage others to read it and I’d love to hear what changes you’ll make when life eventually starts up again:
This is our chance to define a new version of normal, a rare and truly sacred (yes, sacred) opportunity to get rid of the bullsh*t and to only bring back what works for us, what makes our lives richer, what makes our kids happier, what makes us truly proud. We care deeply about one another. That is clear. That can be seen in every supportive Facebook post, in every meal dropped off for a neighbor, in every Zoom birthday party. We are a good people. And as a good people, we want to define — on our own terms — what this country looks like in five, 10, 50 years. This is our chance to do that, the biggest one we have ever gotten. And the best one we’ll ever get.
0009-LiveOak10062017paigegreen
And now for my Stimulus Pledge to YOU. For those who are financially secure during this crisis, and who anticipate getting a stimulus check and can afford it, please consider pledging some or all of your coming stimulus check to prevent homelessness, hunger and illness for our hardworking immigrant families through the Stimulus Pledge: https://stimuluspledge.org/
212_WomensMarchPetaluma_01192019_paigegreen
I don’t have the money to donate right now, but for those who donate, please send me an email with proof of your donation and I’ll put your name in the hat for a free all day photo shoot. That is up to eight hours of photography for whatever you want! Or you can donate your photo shoot to a non-profit of your choice (in the SF Bay Area).
paigegreenBryantTerryFile64560
I am grateful that we are all in this together. As my middle school motto taught me. “Together we can.”
With love and gratitude,
Paige
ps: check out our friend Christian’s drawings. He’s making them again and that makes us happy:
christian-front

 

one voice, one town, one year later…

000373860010_2019WomensMarch_Petaluma_paigegreen_

One year ago I wanted change, but I didn’t know what.

I wanted to be involved, but I didn’t know how.

So I offered to take portraits, because that’s what I know how to do.

But photographing removes me.

I’m involved, but I’m on the outside.

This was clear when I went to take this portrait.

I had no idea who this teenage girl was standing in front of me.

I hadn’t heard her voice crack on the stage moments before.

The emotion swell in her voice.

The fear on her face as she told the sea of strangers, who didn’t look like her, the truth.

The truth of discrimination and racism in our schools and in our town.

I hadn’t seen the tears stream down her cheeks.

The embraces she received once the truth was out.

I was in my corner of the park hidden behind my shield of photography.

Hers was the last portrait of the day.

I was just about to pack up.

But yes, I could take one more portrait.

One more round of questions to try and get a good portrait.

“So do you like high school?” I asked.

Her face dropped.

Didn’t you hear? 

Didn’t you see?

I hadn’t heard.

I hadn’t seen.

But once I finally did see and hear, I couldn’t unsee. I couldn’t un-hear.

I had to do something more than take photos.

I am so grateful for this brave student.

For the leaders of our community who helped her have the courage to share her story.

For the organizers who created the stage.

It is because of their work and her testimony that TIDE (Team for Inclusivity, Diversity and Equity) was created and I am now a part of a movement that fills me with so much love and a purpose greater than taking portraits on the outside.

paigegreen_TIDE_11162019_54A1344

To learn more about TIDE and how you can join the movement to make sure our communities are welcoming for ALL of people…

Here is our newsletter from December:

https://mailchi.mp/81d7192e5160/tide-is-only-10-months-old-but-were-already-planning-our-10th-anniversary-party-3-ways-to-help-us-meet-our-10-year-goals?e=fdce8e8085

Here is a link to our very first article about TIDE in the Bohemian: 
https://www.bohemian.com/northbay/turning-the-tide/Content?oid=9415015&fbclid=IwAR1l6DXRJQwmtZk1V7SRToc-rdaAOCpbdW_n2ZCe7My98KDnIn_8j1FPT0U

You can listen to our podcast with Rabbi Ted:

https://talkingwithrabbited.castos.com/podcasts/337/episodes/missions-milestones?utm_source=listennotes.com&utm_campaign=Listen+Notes&utm_medium=website

Sign up for our newsletter here:

https://forms.gle/fLc3GpcGwrVLMXv59

TIDE is a grassroots organization running entirely by volunteers. We are facilitating conversations within our community to make sure that our schools are welcoming to all of our diverse students. We are offering trainings that are FREE to teachers and school staff and sliding scale for all other community members. 

If you would like to make a contribution on Martin Luther King Jr Day that will directly make a difference for the community we live in, please consider donating to our movement here: http://petalumapeople.org/donate/ (be sure to designate your donation to TIDE)

“In a fractal conception, I am a cell-sized unit of the human organism, and I have to use my life to leverage a shift in the system by how I am, as much as with the things I do. This means actually being in my life, and it means bringing my values into my daily decision making. Each day should be lived on purpose.”
― Adrienne Maree Brown, Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds

TIDE-LOGO-w

Supporting Women makes the world better EVERY day! (but you can get credit towards photo shoots on Giving Tuesday!!!)

257555_0002.JPG

On October 4th, I made a public declaration that I want to work exclusively with other people, nonprofits and businesses committed to doing work in social justice and/or environmental protection because I want my children to live in a world where people are treated equally and kindly, with clean oceans, thriving rainforests and healthy air to breathe and water to drink.

222265_0005

It was a scary statement to make, as the primary breadwinner of my family, but to do anything else feels wrong. So I posted a call for help connecting with agencies and nonprofits who work in these areas.

_WEA_USAccelerator_10172019_paigegreen_0128

And through the amazing interconnected web of social media, I was introduced to WEA: Women’s Earth Alliance. I fell in love immediately.

_WEA_USAccelerator_10162019_paigegreen_0088

WEA is doing exactly the kind of work I want to support, and I was lucky to be able to photograph their first U.S. Grassroots Accelerator for Women Environmental Leaders, in partnership with the Sierra Club, which supports women leaders from the U.S. and U.S. Territories with skills, tools, and networks critical to transforming pressing environmental and climate challenges into scalable solutions for all.

Last year on Giving Tuesday, I raised over $10,000 for the migrants at the US border and Al Otro Lado by giving away photo shoots. I am so grateful that because of my generous community I was able to give that gift, but it’s hard to support my family on free photo shoots.

166_LiaCasey_04142019_paigegreen.jpg

So for Giving Tuesday this year, I want to support the amazing women I met through WEA and the incredible work they are doing in their communities, while also supporting my family. Luckily the wonderful Women’s Earth Alliance has agreed to hire me to help document of these women.

1304_WEA_USAccelerator_10162019_paigegreen

So EVERY person who donates to WEA will be supporting these women AND my family.

19956603_10155182410315020_7765819099765032107_o.jpg

And for EVERY person who donates a minimum of $350 to Women’s Earth Alliance between now and December 31st, 2019, if you send me proof of your donation, I’ll give you credit for $200 that can be used for ANY photo shoot. Here is a link to where you can donate on WEA’s website or their Facebook page, where they are holding a Giving Tuesday fundraiser:

https://womensearthalliance.org/
https://www.facebook.com/womensearthalliance/

101_MarciaBarinaga_04222019_paigegreen108_QuinnMorgan_10102019_paigegreen

190_ErinMcDermott_10052019_paigegreen

A few photos from some of my 2019 Giving Tuesday photo shoots.

Thank you! For supporting me and my family for so many years by supporting my photography. I am very GRATEFUL to be able to give back because of YOUR support on Giving Tuesday and EVERY day.

000269710008_CamilleLouisPtak_03152019_paigegreen.jpg

And now HERE are the women, who INSPIRED me to tears multiple times, and the important work they are doing to:

285521_0011_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Huda Alkaff Founder & Director, Wisconsin Green Muslims West Bend, Wisconsin Bridging faith and environmental justice to educate her Wisconsin community on energy and water conservation.

0719_WEA_USAccelerator_10162019_paigegreen

Angel Amaya Communications Director, Western Organization of Resource Councils Billings, Montana Shifting the narrative on climate change through storytelling projects in Montana.

0952_WEA_USAccelerator_10162019_paigegreen

Mishka Banuri Utah Youth Environmental Solutions Salt Lake City, Utah Empowering young people in Utah to engage with the root causes of local environmental issues from an intersectional perspective.

285524_0014_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Dolores Belmares Texas Field Consultant, Moms Clean Air Force San Antonio, Texas Fighting air pollution and protecting children’s health in her community of San Antonio, Texas.

285523_0016_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Brittany Bennett Development Director, Data for Progress Denver, Colorado Building climate resilient and socially just communities through hackathons.

0828_WEA_USAccelerator_10162019_paigegreen

Elizabeth Chun Hye Lee Climate Justice Lead & Executive for Environmental Justice, United Methodists Women Queens, New York Using faith to grow a culture of climate justice and gender equity in Queens, New York.

285526_0005_WEAHeadshots_10172019

June Farmer Marin City People’s Plan Marin City, California Empowering local underserved youth and adults through eco-literacy training and nature-based adaptation models.

285523_0013_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Brynn Foster Founder & Director, Voyaging Foods Honolulu, Hawaii Reclaiming a regenerative food system and Hawaiian food sovereignty.

285526_0003_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Camille Hadley Program Director, Little Growers Inc Palm Bay, Florida Building sustainable food production systems and providing STEM opportunities for underserved youth in Palm Bay, Florida.

285526_0016_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Crystal Huang Co-Founder & President, People Power Solar Cooperative Oakland, California Creating regenerative economies and making solar power accessible in East Oakland.

285521_0007_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Monica Ibacache Founder; Executive Director, Beyond Organic Design New York, New York Organizing sustainability and permaculture education in New York to prepare children facing the permanent consequences associated with climate change.

285524_0010-e_weaheadshots_10172019.jpg

Jordan Macha Executive Director, Bayou City Waterkeeper Houston, Texas Incorporating nature-based solutions and nature-centered practices in Houston municipal structures.

285523_0007_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Lyrica Maldonado Fellow Organizer, Uplift Flagstaff, Arizona Mobilizing young people all over the Colorado Plateau to train, learn, and develop relationships in the face of climate change.

285522_0008_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Sabina Perez Senator of Guam Prutehi Litekyan/Save Ritidian Hagatña, Guam Preventing environmental degradation in Guam and mobilizing community members to protect Litekyan, a sacred land scheduled to be the site of a firing range.

285526_0009_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Tosha Phonix Food Justice Organizer, Missouri Coalition for the Environment St. Louis, Missouri Organizing against the food apartheid in St. Louis to improve food access and representation of local food systems.

285524_0007_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Beth Roach Co-Founder, Alliance of Native Seedkeepers Richmond, Virginia Rebuilding culture and food security for native peoples through preserving and proliferating native seeds in Richmond, Virginia.

285521_0016_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Magaly Santos Youth Organizer, Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice Gonzales, California Educating agricultural workers on their health rights, and fighting against pesticide-use in the Central Valley of California.

285523_0001-e_WEAHeadshots_10172019

Erin Foster West Western Campaigns Director, National Young Farmers Coalition Denver, Colorado Aiding young farmers to ensure success in adapting to climate change on their farms across the Western U.S.

0884_WEA_USAccelerator_10162019_paigegreen

Melody Zhang Climate Justice Campaign Coordinator, Sojourners Washington D.C. Creating a cultural shift within the church around the issues of climate, and building a church network of climate advocates in Washington D.C.

#givingtuesday #womensearthalliance #paigegreenphotography

When I die there should be no sad songs for me…

Coffee-000044960009-092017paigegreen

In September of 2017, on the cusp of my fortieth birthday, I set a new decade resolution to spend more time with my ninety-three year old grandfather. As a documentary photographer, with an interest in communities, I asked my grandfather if he’d like to do a portrait and interview project in his retirement community. My grandfather said, “yes.”

My goals for this project were simple. I wanted to have quality time with my grandfather, I wanted to honor and appreciate this last chapter of his life and the community that he chose to spend it with. When I asked him who he wanted to focus on for the project, my grandfather chose the coffee group that he religiously meets with every morning except for Sunday.

The result of that project was a book of portraits and interview excerpts called The Coffee Group that I shared with my grandfather’s community in summer of 2018.

Coffee-000044960016-092017paigegreen

On March 19th, 2019, my grandfather, Robert Harper, passed away at 5:30am. He was the foundation of our family and he will be greatly missed. I will be forever grateful for the time I had working with him on this project, and his words are a comfort as we figure out how to recalibrate our family without our navigator. Here is my grandfather’s portrait and interview from the book:

Robert Harper, Geography Professor/ Author

grandpa_54A0380-e

Sally and I met working on the high school paper. Working on the paper was really the first time that boys and girls had a chance to work together. Everything was separated, so none of us had any experience with the other sex in a social way. At Christmas that first semester Sally and I were working together, she invited me to go on a hayride sponsored by her club. Well, we went on the hayride and I was thrilled with her. But I was shy around girls, and really, adults too.

Afterward I was afraid if I called to ask her out she might say, “no,” or I might have to talk to her parents, and I didn’t want to do that. So I put it off and put it off. That’s when my best friend, George McCoy, locked me in the basement and said he wouldn’t let me out until I called her. But once that happened the dam broke and we were dating all the time.

I thought she was great. She was prickly, but we got along and I just liked being with her. She was my best friend. I was really thrilled when she put on a card one time, “The best thing I ever did was say, ‘I do.'”

My life was serendipity. It all just bubbled along. A wartime wedding and the GI Bill changed my life path. I enjoyed writing the textbooks. I enjoyed teaching. I enjoyed some of the work with organizations. I didn’t always succeed at stuff when I tried, but generally I did. I didn’t plan my life, but my life couldn’t have come out better, except that I wish Sally had lived longer, and I had lived not so long.

I was always kidding her, saying that I’d die and she’d marry some other guy. She pooh-poohed that. I certainly didn’t expect to be the one to live the longest. I don’t want to share my life anymore with anybody except her. I’m a one-woman man.

I don’t dream much, but when I dream I have almost never seen her in a dream. That doesn’t mean I don’t miss her, but I’m a pragmatist. My feeling is that when something happens, it happens. And when it’s over, it’s over, and there’s nothing you can do about it. So there’s no sense mourning about it all. You just have to go onto the next chapter.

I always was afraid of death because I didn’t think there was life after death, but now I’m to a point where it really doesn’t matter to me. When I die there should be no sad songs for me. I have had a good life. But I don’t want anybody trying to extend my life. There’s a difference between living and existing, and I don’t want to just exist.

I grew up in a religious, Republican family. Very traditional. Very conservative. Sally did too. But I think the University of Chicago changed our perspective. There was a lot of social concern and discussion of issues like that. Sally always was afraid she’d become a communist going to that school. But it changed our perspective on life. So once we rejected that old system, it was a matter of learning a new system.

I certainly have shifted from traditional Christianity to feeling that some kind of world religion will ultimately come out of this, and that a lot of religion is just superstition. When you think about how poorly most of the people have lived on the Earth, they were certainly looking for a world that was better than their lot. The poorer you were, the more you wanted.

I don’t really think that there’s life after death, but if there is, I hope they let us look down to see what’s going on in the world, because I think we’re at the beginning of a revolution that is going to change life as much as the agricultural revolution and the industrial revolution. I think this information data revolution is going to revolutionize your lives and the lives of your kids. It’s going to be a whole different ballgame.

_54A1995

For more about my grandfather and how much he meant to our family:

https://paigegreenblog.com/2007/08/15/traditions/

https://paigegreenblog.com/2008/08/26/bathing-beauties/

https://paigegreenblog.com/2009/09/21/apple-dumplings-root-beer-saloon-my-grandparents-and-me/

https://paigegreenblog.com/2009/08/17/65-years-photos-for-my-blob-part-i/

https://paigegreenblog.com/2010/01/12/my-grandpa-will-always-be-my-favorite-santa/

https://paigegreenblog.com/2011/09/26/you-made-my-life/

https://paigegreenblog.com/2012/01/01/why-am-i-doing-this-again-best-of-2011/

https://paigegreenblog.com/2016/01/04/i-want-to-learn-how-to-drive-a-monster-truck-in-2016/

 

%d bloggers like this: